Apr 18-23; Photosensory receptors and signal transduction, Italy; C.Fankhauser: co-chair

April 18-23, 2010
Il Ciocco Hotel and Resort
Lucca (Barga), Italy

Application Deadline

Applications for this meeting must be submitted by March 28, 2010. Please apply early, as some meetings become oversubscribed (full) before this deadline. If the meeting is oversubscribed, it will be stated here. Applications will still be accepted for oversubscribed meetings. However, they will only be considered by the Conference Chair if more seats become available due to cancellations.
Related Meeting Information
The Photosensory Receptors & Signal Transduction Gordon Research Conference will be held in conjunction with the Photosensory Receptors & Signal Transduction Gordon-Kenan Research Seminar. Those interested in attending both meetings must submit an application for the GKRS in addition to an application for the GRC. Please refer to the Photosensory Receptors & Signal Transduction GKRS web page for more information.

The 2010 Gordon Research Conference on Photosensory Receptors and Signal Transduction, held April 18-23 at the Il Ciocco Conference Center (Barga, IT), will provide a forum for discussions of the biological, chemical and physical aspects of the diverse group of proteins used throughout biology to convert light into signals controlling biological function. Aided by the explosion of newly-available photosensors provided by genomic sequencing efforts, this field has been joined by both new families of photoreceptors and a many new members of existing ones. Taken together, these provide a diverse array of model systems to answer fundamental questions in protein signaling: How can small molecule chromophores trigger allosteric changes to a surrounding protein? How are these changes transmitted to downstream effectors? How are the sensitivity, lifetime and other features of this process tuned to match the needs of the biological system?

This conference will provide insight into these issues with a program that offers comparative discussions of the families of natural photoreceptors. By combining data from in vitro studies and from bacteria, plants and animal systems, underlying similarities and differences among different photoreceptors will be highlighted. Additional sessions will focus on novel biophysical and biochemical research approaches to study the signaling properties of these proteins, along with discussions of the engineering of these proteins for biotechnological use.

Invited speakers will provide discussions of groundbreaking research from the range of disciplines in this diverse field, including biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, physiology and chemistry. This meeting will assemble established investigators, junior scientists and graduate students working in the field. The formal program will include a mix of oral and poster presentations, with some poster presentations being selected for short talks. This program will be complemented by the new addition of a Gordon Research Seminar immediately preceding this meeting, providing additional opportunities for postdocs and graduate students to present their research in talks and posters. Combined with time for informal discussions throughout the meeting, this conference will provide ample chances for integration and cross-disciplinary collaborations in this exciting area.

Kevin Gardner, chair
Christian Fankhauser, vice-chair